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I Remember Nothing

Cover of I Remember Nothing

I Remember Nothing

And Other Reflections
Borrow Borrow
Nora Ephron returns with her first audiobook since the astounding success of I Feel Bad About My Neck, taking a cool, hard, hilarious look at the past, the present, and the future, bemoaning the vicissitudes of modern life, and recalling with her signature clarity and wisdom everything she hasn't (yet) forgotten.
Ephron writes about falling hard for a way of life ("Journalism: A Love Story") and about breaking up even harder with the men in her life ("The D Word"); lists "Twenty-five Things People Have a Shocking Capacity to Be Surprised by Over and Over Again" ("There is no explaining the stock market but people try"; "Cary Grant was Jewish"; "Men cheat"); reveals the alarming evolution, a decade after she wrote and directed You've Got Mail, of her relationship with her in-box ("The Six Stages of E-Mail"); and asks the age-old question, which came first, the chicken soup or the cold? All the while, she gives candid, edgy voice to everything women who have reached a certain age have been thinking . . . but rarely acknowledging.
Filled with insights and observations that instantly ring true—and could have come only from Nora Ephron—I Remember Nothing is pure joy.
Nora Ephron returns with her first audiobook since the astounding success of I Feel Bad About My Neck, taking a cool, hard, hilarious look at the past, the present, and the future, bemoaning the vicissitudes of modern life, and recalling with her signature clarity and wisdom everything she hasn't (yet) forgotten.
Ephron writes about falling hard for a way of life ("Journalism: A Love Story") and about breaking up even harder with the men in her life ("The D Word"); lists "Twenty-five Things People Have a Shocking Capacity to Be Surprised by Over and Over Again" ("There is no explaining the stock market but people try"; "Cary Grant was Jewish"; "Men cheat"); reveals the alarming evolution, a decade after she wrote and directed You've Got Mail, of her relationship with her in-box ("The Six Stages of E-Mail"); and asks the age-old question, which came first, the chicken soup or the cold? All the while, she gives candid, edgy voice to everything women who have reached a certain age have been thinking . . . but rarely acknowledging.
Filled with insights and observations that instantly ring true—and could have come only from Nora Ephron—I Remember Nothing is pure joy.
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Excerpts-
  • From the book

    I Remember Nothing

    I have been forgetting things for years--at least since I was in my thirties. I know this because I wrote something about it at the time. I have proof. Of course, I can't remember exactly where I wrote about it, or when, but I could probably hunt it up if I had to.

    In my early days of forgetting things, words would slip away, and names. I did what you normally do when this happens: I scrolled through a mental dictionary, trying to figure out what letter the word began with, and how many syllables were involved. Eventually the lost thing would float back into my head, recaptured. I never took such lapses as harbingers of doom, or old age, or actual senescence. I always knew that whatever I'd forgotten was eventually going to come back to me sooner or later. Once I went to a store to buy a book about Alzheimer's disease and forgot the name of it. I thought it was funny. And it was, at the time.

    Here's a thing I've never been able to remember: the title of that movie with Jeremy Irons. The one about Claus von Bülow. You know the one. All I ever succeeded in remembering was that it was three words long, and the middle word was "of." For many years, this did not bother me at all, because no one I knew could ever think of the title either. One night, eight of us were at the theater together, and not one of us could retrieve it. Finally, at intermission, someone went out to the street and Googled it; we were all informed of the title and we all vowed to remember it forever. For all I know, the other seven did. I, on the other hand, am back to remembering that it's three words long with an "of" in the middle.

    By the way, when we finally learned the title that night, we all agreed it was a bad title. No wonder we didn't remember it.


    I am going to Google for the name of that movie. Be right back. . . .


    It's Reversal of Fortune.

    How is one to remember that title? It has nothing to do with anything.

    But here's the point: I have been forgetting things for years, but now I forget in a new way. I used to believe I could eventually retrieve whatever was lost and then commit it to memory. Now I know I can't possibly. Whatever's gone is hopelessly gone. And what's new doesn't stick.

    The other night I met a man who informed me that he had a neurological disorder and couldn't remember the faces of people he'd met. He said that sometimes he looked at himself in a mirror and had no idea whom he was looking at. I don't mean to minimize this man's ailment, which I'm sure is a bona fide syndrome with a long name that's capitalized, but all I could think was, Welcome to my world. A couple of years ago, the actor Ryan O'Neal confessed that he'd recently failed to recognize his own daughter, Tatum, at a funeral and had accidentally made a pass at her. Everyone was judgmental about this, but not me. A month earlier, I'd found myself in a mall in Las Vegas when I saw a very pleasant-looking woman coming toward me, smiling, her arms outstretched, and I thought, Who is this woman? Where do I know her from? Then she spoke and I realized it was my sister Amy.

    You might think, Well, how was she to know her sister would be in Las Vegas? I'm sorry to report that not only did I know, but she was the person I was meeting in the mall.

    All this makes me feel sad, and wistful, but mostly it makes me feel old. I have many symptoms of old age, aside from the physical. I occasionally repeat myself. I use the expression, "When I was young." Often I don't get the joke, although I pretend that I do. If I go see a play or a movie for a second time, it's...

About the Author-
  • Nora Ephron is the author of the huge best seller I Feel Bad About My Neck as well as Heartburn, Crazy Salad, Wallflower at the Orgy, and Scribble Scribble. She recently wrote and directed the hit movie Julie & Julia and has received Academy Award nominations for Best Original Screenplay for When Harry Met Sally . . . , Silkwood, and Sleepless in Seattle, which she also directed. Her other credits include the script for the current stage hit Love, Loss, and What I Wore with Delia Ephron.
Reviews-
  • AudioFile Magazine It's not easy to reveal everything about your life--especially if you can't remember it all. But Nora Ephron cleanses her soul and reveals all she can recall, applying her personal brand of humor. Fond memories include growing up in a Beverly Hills family in the "biz" and working in the trenches of journalism in New York City. She also recounts the heartbreak of watching her mother drink away her life. Ephron--whose most-well-known work is the movie WHEN HARRY MET SALLY--is a natural storyteller--intelligent yet approachable, lighthearted yet experienced with life's difficulties, such as divorce, an aging and distant father, and competing in a male-dominated field. But Ephron is a clever survivor, and the listener is the benefactor of her honesty as she unselfishly shares her achievements, joys, and sorrows. But I find myself yearning to know about the parts she's forgotten. B.J.P. (c) AudioFile 2011, Portland, Maine
  • People Magazine (Top 10 Books of 2010) "At 69, she's just two years older than Keith Richards, but to hear her tell it, Ephron's recall's far worse. Luckily some synapses are still firing: The follow-up to I Feel Bad About My Neck includes chapters on her youth and career and drily hilarious musings on the trials of aging. If we have to grow old (and as they say, consider the alternative) there's no better guide."
  • Craig Wilson, USA Today "Vivid . . . Nora Ephron's newest book is titled I Remember Nothing. She's lying. Although her confessional about forgetting people's names rings all too true to those of a certain age, she's still lying. Ephron remembers quite a bit in this entertaining collection of stories about her life so far. . . . Ephron has been handed some good material to play with over the years and she knows what to do with it. Anyone who has grown to appreciate her witty and carefree way of telling a story will not be disappointed here. She remains the neighbor we all wish we had. Someone to share a cup of coffee with. Or better yet, a glass of wine. Maybe two. . . . [Ephron] has not lost her ability to zero in on modern life's little mysteries, like our obsession with freshly ground pepper and bottled water. As for the essay about remembering nothing, which kicks off this delightful collection, it's one that millions of aging Americans will relate to. Listen. . . . If we're all headed to the old folks home, we couldn't have a better guide than Nora Ephron."
  • Jane Juska, San Francisco Chronicle
    "The seduction of Nora Ephron's writing is that after reading a couple of paragraphs you think you can do it, too. Her writing is so straightforward, so honest, so direct that gee, it shouldn't be hard to make sentences like that. So you try, and then you realize that not only do your sentences sag in the middle and end in semi-colons; you realize that you don't live in New York, haven't gone to endless dinner parties, are not a fabulous cook, have never directed a film, written a play or novel, or actually anything . . . It's not just that she gives us permission to eat butter and say unkind things about our parents . . . It's that she is so clear-eyed, so free of vitriol and sarcasm and artifice that we believe everything she says. . . . 'The D Word,' her reflection on divorce, ought to be tacked up on the wall of every divorce court in the world, and the judge should say, before reaching a decision, 'Read this.' It is a powerful section [and] heartbreaking . . . She [also] writes about her own shortcomings, about betrayals by people she admired and most movingly, about the death of her best friend. If a theme runs beneath the wit and cleverness of I Remember Nothing, it is about the difficulty of coming to terms with one's mortality. . . . At the end she writes a list of things she will miss . . . What I will miss is not being around for all the books Nora Ephron is going to write."
  • Carolyn See, The Washington Post Book World
    "Fabulous . . . Masterly . . . [Ephron is] a tremendously talented woman . . . She'll dazzle you with strings of perfect prose."
  • David Kamp, Vanity Fair "I Remember Nothing reads like a swan song . . . But here's hoping that Ephron, who will turn 70 next year, has at least a few more terrific books and movies in her."
  • Time "I Remember Nothing: Fortunately that's not quite true. In these essays, Nora Ephron covers her divorce, her early years in journalism, her obsession with online Scrabble and her mother's alcoholism. She does forget what happened when she met Eleanor Roosevelt. But she remembers plenty."
  • Wesley Morris, Boston Sunday Globe "[I Remember Nothing has] the rare combination of youth and wisdom. . . . Ephron's skill as a personal essayist resides in her finesse. She locates a kernel of universality . . . She's practicing the social criticism she's so good at."
  • Alex Kuczynski, The New York Times Book Review
    "Tantalizingly fresh and forthright . . . Essays about her mother's alcoholism and Ephron's sense of betrayal by the writer Lillian Hellman cover previously uncharted territory and are also among the most thoughtful parts of the book. . . . She's self-effacing and brilliant. I use lines
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And Other Reflections
Nora Ephron
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